Ditching the Phrase “Struggling Student”

I hear this phrase a lot. Many language teachers lament about staying after school to help a “struggling student,” that a student is “struggling” with grammar point X, or that they have a group of “struggling students” in their second year, Spanish 2 class, etc.. When it comes to language acquisition, however, there’s no struggling…… Continue reading Ditching the Phrase “Struggling Student”

We Are Not Alone: Discovering a Nation of Advocates

One of the central challenges we are trying to address in this blog (that of shrinking and/or homogeneous classes) is magnified in, but not limited to, Latin programs. Although I was frustrated and disappointed to hear it, I was also somewhat relieved to learn that modern language teachers and programs frequently suffer from the same…… Continue reading We Are Not Alone: Discovering a Nation of Advocates

Latin’s Dark History With Light-Skinned Learners

Rereading John Bracey’s post got me thinking again… I used to work at a school that prided itself on being “part of a multicultural community,” but that tends to be the type of thing you find written on a school’s website that’s just for show, or to check a box for NEASC accreditation. I can say that it…… Continue reading Latin’s Dark History With Light-Skinned Learners

Your Program: Basing it on Acquiring Latin (3 of 3)

Look, I don’t want to have to say it, but I have to say it…you need to start speaking Latin. It’s true that the universally agreed-upon sine qua non of language acquisition is Comprehensible Input (i.e. understandable messages one listens to, and/or reads), which could, theoretically, be limited to ONLY written messages, but don’t stop there…… Continue reading Your Program: Basing it on Acquiring Latin (3 of 3)