Neurodiversity in our Classrooms

One of many types of diversity that characterize our classrooms is neurodiversity. As Nick Walker, the scholar behind Neurocosmopolitanism, writes, We are a neurologically diverse species: the enormous innate variation among individual human bodies extends to our brains, which differ from one another like fingerprints. This diversity of brains means a diversity of cognitive styles, a diversity…… Continue reading Neurodiversity in our Classrooms

Your Program: Basing it on Acquiring Latin (2 of 3)

My last post followed this logic: ALL humans can acquire a second language. Few humans learn about languages. Programs based on learning about Latin are exclusive. Programs based on acquiring Latin are inclusive. This post addresses how to base a program on acquiring Latin. I’ll begin with an important systematic change that otherwise keeps Latin programs exclusive: **Stop grading…… Continue reading Your Program: Basing it on Acquiring Latin (2 of 3)

In Defense of the Standards 1; A General Framework for Accessibility and Inclusiveness

For the first time in the modern era of Latin instruction we have a framework which, in the right hands and applied in a thoughtful manner, can provide a truly accessible path of acquisition for all learners who enter our classrooms. The previous set of Standards (1997) paved the way for educators to seriously consider…… Continue reading In Defense of the Standards 1; A General Framework for Accessibility and Inclusiveness

Your Latin Program: Exclusive or Inclusive? (1 of 3)

Some have described the way I teach languages as ideological or dogmatic—other contributors to this blog are no strangers to that criticism, either—and it’s certainly true that a lot of my teaching is directly informed by definitive research, but I no longer feel the need to espouse and cite research to arrive at the following,…… Continue reading Your Latin Program: Exclusive or Inclusive? (1 of 3)

School isn’t Exclusive

It used to be exclusive. Education was something for the elite and wealthy; schools were founded to provide, at a cost that necessarily excluded a large percentage of the population, elevated status and superiority to the uneducated masses. Even once free public education was established, a difference arose between the wealthier families who could afford…… Continue reading School isn’t Exclusive