Neurodiversity in our Classrooms

One of many types of diversity that characterize our classrooms is neurodiversity. As Nick Walker, the scholar behind Neurocosmopolitanism, writes, We are a neurologically diverse species: the enormous innate variation among individual human bodies extends to our brains, which differ from one another like fingerprints. This diversity of brains means a diversity of cognitive styles, a diversity…… Continue reading Neurodiversity in our Classrooms

Your Program: Basing it on Acquiring Latin (2 of 3)

My last post followed this logic: ALL humans can acquire a second language. Few humans learn about languages. Programs based on learning about Latin are exclusive. Programs based on acquiring Latin are inclusive. This post addresses how to base a program on acquiring Latin. I’ll begin with an important systematic change that otherwise keeps Latin programs exclusive: **Stop grading…… Continue reading Your Program: Basing it on Acquiring Latin (2 of 3)

Your Latin Program: Exclusive or Inclusive? (1 of 3)

Some have described the way I teach languages as ideological or dogmatic—other contributors to this blog are no strangers to that criticism, either—and it’s certainly true that a lot of my teaching is directly informed by definitive research, but I no longer feel the need to espouse and cite research to arrive at the following,…… Continue reading Your Latin Program: Exclusive or Inclusive? (1 of 3)

Welcome to the Inclusive Latin Classroom

Welcome to ILC!  We are a group of Latin teachers from all over the United States, colleagues and friends, veterans, mid-career and new to the profession.  Between us, we teach Latin in middle schools, high schools, and universities. We all have in common that we have embraced the theories and practices that make up Comprehensible…… Continue reading Welcome to the Inclusive Latin Classroom